Last edited by Zulurn
Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

5 edition of Political Geography of the Nazi Party Vote found in the catalog.

Political Geography of the Nazi Party Vote

Colin Flint

Political Geography of the Nazi Party Vote

by Colin Flint

  • 133 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Ucl Pr Ltd .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fascism & Nazism,
  • Germany,
  • Political geography,
  • History: World

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages224
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12009601M
    ISBN 101857287711
    ISBN 109781857287714
    OCLC/WorldCa505101982

      by Kevin Baker. In Germans into Nazis, Peter Fritzsche examines four moments in German history between and that exemplify how the Nazi movement became looks at the mass crowds of July-August when Germany mobilized at the beginning of the Great War, the crowds in following military defeat, the crowds after Hitler was appointed Chancellor, . The Nazis were a political party that only got a small amount of the votes, something like 28% I think. This means that if Jews did vote for Hitler only a small amount did.

      As scholars of Holocaust studies, crimes against humanity and political behaviour, we believe the accounts of these women give an insight into the role of women in the rise of the Nazi party. The Communist Party devoted energy and resources to electoral campaigns starting in Communist candidates were able to win about , votes in several elections during the s and in Senate races in topped , The maps and charts show the geography of party strength, detailing the number of votes for Communist Party candidates for each county and every electoral contest.

    The American Nazi Party (ANP) is an American neo-Nazi political party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell; its headquarters are in Arlington, ll founded the organization as the World Union of Free Enterprise National Socialists (WUFENS), but renamed it the American Nazi Party in Since the late s, a number of small groups have used the name "American Nazi Party" with International affiliation: World Union of National Socialists.   Christaller and Nazism Posted on August 9, | 5 Comments It is well known among philosophers that Heidegger was a member of the Nazi party and that this is an event that has to be taken into account in any interpretation of his work.


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Political Geography of the Nazi Party Vote by Colin Flint Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Political Geography of Nazism: The Spatial Diffusion of the Nazi Party Vote in Germany. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Geography, University of Colorado-Boulder. Cited by: 7 rows  Spatial Analysis of the Nazi Party Vote, Identifying and Tracking a Diffusion. Background: This is a chapter from a middle school geography textbook published in the midst of the war.

It reviews Nazi actions after and summarizes the Nazi claim that Germany needed more space. This was a major element of Nazi propaganda.

The spatial lag term is significant, which may represent the importance of preexisting networks to Nazi mobilization and the likelihood that the joining process was one of hierarchical diffusion. Finally, results from regional models emphasize the varied political geography of Nazi by: 6.

The theoretical framework and statistical operationalization proposed are illustrated by a statistical analysis of the growth of the Nazi party vote in Baden between and This paper makes two contributions towards making a theoretically driven electoral geography a vital component of by: 4.

Two periods of electoral change established the Nazi party as a political force. The NSDAP increased their share of the vote from % in the Reichstag election of May to % in September In the following Reichstag election of July the Nazi party increased its support further to %.Cited by: Assistant professor of international affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

His research interests are in world‐systems analysis, political geography, and spatial statistics. He is the authorkoauthor of articles on the electoral geography of Nazi party vote and English by: 94 books based on 40 votes: The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany by William L.

Shirer, The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank. Before the onset of the Great Depression in Germany in –, the National Socialist German Workers' Party (or Nazi Party for short) was a small party on the radical right of the German political spectrum.

In the Reichstag (parliament) elections of May 2,the Nazis received only percent of the national vote, a proportionate decline fromwhen the Nazis received 3 percent. Nazi Party, byname of National Socialist German Workers’ Party, German Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), political party of the mass movement known as National Socialism.

Under the leadership of Adolf Hitler, the party came to power in Germany in and governed by totalitarian methods until The National Socialist German Workers' Party (abbreviated in German as NSDAP), commonly referred to in English as the Nazi Party, was a far-right political party in Germany that was active between andthat created and supported the ideology of National precursor, the German Workers' Party (Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; DAP), existed from to Ideology: Nazism.

In their early studies of the Nazi vote, Heberle,Heberle, and Loomis and Beegle () closely followed the reasoning of the Official Statistics of the Reich.

They expected small (2–5 ha) and medium-sized (5–20 ha) farmers to be the politically most relevant strata with the highest likelihood to vote for the Nazi by: 2. on the Nazi party vote because of the additional ex planation that a contextual approach offers.

Our ap proach, then, is complementary to the hundreds of local studies of this phenomenon completed to date (Grill ). Context in electoral geography When dealing with aggregate data, the political geography perspective blends both regional hetero.

Providing a clear, straightforward, and complete history-both thematic and chronological-of the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party, author Jackson J.

Spielvogel places the emergence of Hitler and the Third Reich within the social, economic, and political contexts that made it all possible. Topics examined are the cultural and social aspects of the Nazi regime, including sections on art and /5(16).

Support for the Nazi Party John O’Loughlin Institute of Behavioral Science and Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO e-mail: [email protected] For more than half a century, social scientists have probed the aggregate correlates of the vote for the Nazi party (NSDAP) in Weimar Germany.

Since individual-level File Size: KB. These changes made Germany a one-party state and destroyed democracy in the country.

When a new Reichstag election was held in Decemberthe Nazis won 92 per cent of the vote. Life for. National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism (/ ˈ n ɑː t s i ɪ z əm, ˈ n æ t-/), is the ideology and practices associated with the Nazi Party—officially the National Socialist German Workers' Party (Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP)—in Nazi Germany, and of other far-right groups with similar ideas and aims.

The growth of the Nazi party vote in Baden between May and July is used to exemplify the social theoretical view of space and the application of spatial statistics. Agnew, J. Place and politics: The geographical mediation of state and by: The publication begins with an account of the rise of the Nazi party and a biography of its leader, Adolf Hitler.

This shows how following World War I with Germany facing economic depression and forced to pay reparations as a result of the Treaty of Versailles, the Nazi party arose in opposition to the Marxists and the Centre party/5(44). The essays in this collection originated at a symposium on the teaching of political geography focused on the implementation of Standard 13 (National Geography Standards), "How the forces of cooperation and conflict among people influence the division and control of earth's surface." The 16 chapters (or essays) in the collection are: (1) "Teaching Political Geography" (Fiona M.

Davidson Cited by: 1. Hitler joined the Nazi Party in and was influential in defining its beliefs. He also led the Munich Putsch in However, from to the unpopular party gained little electoral success.

Hitler and his Nazi party officials at the Nuremberg rally. Photograph: Hugo Jaeger/The Life Picture Collection/Getty By the s, social history had arrived on the scene.Which of the following best characterizes the political geography of the Fertile Crescent?

The territorial ambitions of the Nazi party in the s exemplified the idea of Wasted Vote. Redistricting so that the opposition is spread across many districts as a minority is termed a(n) _____ strategy.